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Negative: What Does My Result Mean?

Comprehensive BRACAnalysis®


No Mutation Detected: Overview

If your test result is "No Mutation Detected":

  • There were no mutations or alterations found in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene
  • The chance that you have hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome is significantly reduced
  • This is good news, but please remember:
  • The test looks for mutations only in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes
  • You could still have an increased risk for developing breast or ovarian cancer from other factors not covered by the test


More about your test result

Genetic Variant, Favor Polymorphism: Overview

If your test result is "Genetic Variant, Favor Polymorphism":

  • A genetic change or variant was detected in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene
  • It is normal to see some variation in genes—not everyone is alike
  • These variants are called polymorphisms
  • Polymorphisms do not cause hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome
  • The chance that you have HBOC syndrome is significantly reduced


Your Cancer Risks

  • Your cancer risks should be estimated based on your family and personal history of cancer
  • Your doctor can help you understand these risks
  • The possibility remains that your cancer risks could be increased due to:
  • Other non-hereditary factors (for example: environment)
  • Another hereditary cancer syndrome that this test does not identify
  • A mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 that current technology cannot detect


On to "Negative: What should I do now?"

Single Site BRACAnalysis®


No Mutation Detected: Overview

One or more of your blood relatives was previously tested and either a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation was identified.

  • You were tested for this specific mutation and no mutation was detected
  • You did not inherit the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation that runs in your family
  • You do not have hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome*


* If you have a history of cancer on both your mother's and father's side of the family, you should talk to your doctor about whether any additional testing is appropriate.

More about your test result

Your Cancer Risks

Everyone has some chance of developing cancer. While your Single Site BRACAnalysis® indicates that you do not have hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome, you still have the general population risk to develop cancer. Your cancer risk may still be above average due to other risk factors. Talk to your doctor about your individual risk profile.

On to "Negative: What should I do now?"

Multisite 3 BRACAnalysis®

No Mutation Detected: Overview

Multisite 3 BRACAnalysis® detects three specific BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations that account for the vast majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndromes in people with Ashkenazi, or Eastern European Jewish, ancestry.

  • In your case, none of these three mutations were detected
  • Some people with Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry may have mutations other than the ones for which you were tested
  • You could consider further testing with Comprehensive BRACAnalysis®, a test that looks for these other mutations
  • Talk about this possibility with your doctor


Your Cancer Risks

If no mutation has been identified in your family:

  • The chance that you have HBOC syndrome is significantly reduced
  • The possibility remains that your cancer risks could be above average due to other risk factors. Talk to your doctor about your individual risk profile
  • When no mutation has been identified in your family, relatives usually do not need to consider BRACAnalysis® testing
  • In some cases, another relative who has been diagnosed with cancer should consider testing. Talk with your doctor to evaluate this option


Your Cancer Risks

If a mutation has been identified in your family:

  • You were tested for this specific mutation and the test was negative
  • You did not inherit the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation that runs in your family
  • You do not have hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome*


* If you have a history of cancer on both your mother's and father's side of the family, you should talk to your doctor about whether any additional testing is appropriate.

On to "Negative: What should I do now?"

"Genetic testing helped me...do everything in my power to fight the high risk of cancer that runs in my family."

- Cathy

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